Home 2012 February

All Hail Cindy Sherman

Cindy Sherman’s sprawling, hotly anticipated retrospective opened last week at the Museum of Modern Art in New York to legions of adoring friends, fans, and fellow artists (Chuck Close and Blondie’s Debbie Harry were both spotted making the scene at Tuesday night’s opening, as were John Waters, Michael Stipe, Martha Stewart, Kim Cattrall, Molly Ringwald, designer Narciso Rodriguez, and former Marc Jacobs boy-toy Lorenzo Martone). The comprehensive exhibition is a coup both for Sherman and for the museum, which has taken some slack over the past few years for its relatively limited number of exhibitions from mid-career and established female artists. It’s also a must-see for art- and fashion-lovers alike. Sherman emerged in the late-1970s and early-1980s with a now signature approach and aesthetic: she…

Read More..

Cindy Sherman’s sprawling, hotly anticipated retrospective opened last week at the Museum of Modern Art in New York to legions of adoring friends, fans, and fellow artists (Chuck Close and Blondie’s Debbie Harry were both spotted making the scene at Tuesday night’s opening, as were John Waters, Michael Stipe, Martha Stewart, Kim Cattrall, Molly Ringwald, designer Narciso Rodriguez, and former Marc Jacobs boy-toy Lorenzo Martone). The comprehensive exhibition is a coup both for Sherman and for the museum, which has taken some slack over the past few years for its relatively limited number of exhibitions from mid-career and established female artists. It’s also a must-see for art- and fashion-lovers alike.

Sherman emerged in the late-1970s and early-1980s with a now signature approach and aesthetic: she takes pictures of herself dressed as different characters and female “types” (think vixen, housewife, ingénue, and other paradigms of stage and screen). Over the years Sherman’s self-styled characters have become stranger and more stirring. Her “Centerfold” series is a highlight at MoMA—intimate self-portraits shot in that classic Playboy wide format but picturing women fully clothed and at their most emotionally vulnerable.

Sherman dons prosthetics as a busty Virgin Mary in a series of photographs based on the ways in which women are portrayed throughout art history; caked-on make-up and luxe kaftans in her recent “Society Portraits,” or “The Real Housewives of Easthampton,” if you will; and vintage Chanel in a new body of work that defies the glam nature of most fashion shoots with Sherman’s decidedly unsexy takes on modeling couture. The performances are Oscar-worthy. The characters are spot-on. And Sherman reaffirms her status as the most influential female artists of the last 50 years.

Cindy Sherman at the Museum of Modern Art through June 11; 11 W. 53rd Street, between Fifth and Sixth Avenues; 212-708-9400; moma.org

Main Image: Cindy Sherman. Untitled #466. 2008. Chromogenic color print, 8′ 6″ x 70″ (259.1 x 177.8 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Acquired through the generosity of Robert B. Menschel in honor of Jerry I. Speyer. © 2012 Cindy Sherman. For more images, see the gallery at right.


Packing for Milano

If you don’t like travel, I’m not sure I can recommend the fashion industry. You’re constantly chasing shows, trends and designers. On the road, what might normally be a luxury becomes a necessity—if only for temporarily preserving your sanity. As Milan Fashion Week comes to an end, here’s a quick review of what I brought along for the ride… The Uniform Isaia suit. Charvet ties in blue, black and grey with an occasional flash of color. Crocodile belts from Prada (or custom-made). I could get dressed in the dark—as one often does when recovering from the red-eye. Turnbull and Asser Shirt Once you find your shirt, you stick with it. Mine are from Turnbull and Asser, each with my initials woven into the midsection. Every…

Read More..

If you don’t like travel, I’m not sure I can recommend the fashion industry. You’re constantly chasing shows, trends and designers. On the road, what might normally be a luxury becomes a necessity—if only for temporarily preserving your sanity. As Milan Fashion Week comes to an end, here’s a quick review of what I brought along for the ride…

The Uniform

Isaia suit. Charvet ties in blue, black and grey with an occasional flash of color. Crocodile belts from Prada (or custom-made). I could get dressed in the dark—as one often does when recovering from the red-eye.

Turnbull and Asser Shirt

Once you find your shirt, you stick with it. Mine are from Turnbull and Asser, each with my initials woven into the midsection. Every shirt has two buttons at the collar to keep it high throughout the day, plus barrel cuffs with the diagonal corner cut.

Wolford Socks

Wolford’s over-the-calf cotton velvet socks are the only ones I own—and they never fall down. Could they cut off your circulation? Well, who am I to judge? The socks come in grey, black, blue and occasionally beige. They stopped producing brown, which is really a trauma.

Piaget Watch

The Altiplano Double Jeu is two watches in one, with a flip-top revealing a hidden second face. I set the top one for where I am and the bottom one for NYC, which really comes in handy for places like India where there are half-hour time differences. And Piaget makes remarkably thin watches to begin with, so even the two-in-one Double Jeu avoids feeling like wrist dumbbells.

Edward Green and John Lobb Shoes

Edward Green crafts a masterful dress shoe. John Lobb makes a more casual suede shoe—my preference for travel days. If it’s a longer trip, I may throw in a pair from Loro Piana for good measure.

iPad and Blackberry

Each has its own finger-pleasing covering—the iPad in its Salvatore Ferragamo sleeve and the BlackBerry with its Valextra crocodile back.


10 Moments in Time

SaksPOV shutterbug Kristen Somody Whalen captures the most amazing moments from New York Fashion Week

I started doing Fashion Week for V Magazine in 2003. It was like boot camp… I had to bully my way into the shows. I did everything from backstage to the front row. The assignment was get in anywhere you can. As a photographer you have to have a thick skin. There are a lot of restrictions for photographers. It’s been nice as the years go on becoming a veteran of fashion week, knowing who people are, what’s important, what’s not. For me one of my most fun aspect of fashion week is that it’s like a reunion of people you haven’t seen in 6 months. You get to watching people grow in the industry: the intern that used to work in the accessories department…

Read More..

I started doing Fashion Week for V Magazine in 2003. It was like boot camp… I had to bully my way into the shows. I did everything from backstage to the front row. The assignment was get in anywhere you can.

As a photographer you have to have a thick skin. There are a lot of restrictions for photographers. It’s been nice as the years go on becoming a veteran of fashion week, knowing who people are, what’s important, what’s not. For me one of my most fun aspect of fashion week is that it’s like a reunion of people you haven’t seen in 6 months. You get to watching people grow in the industry: the intern that used to work in the accessories department is now running the magazine. It’s one big happy family.

The most exciting thing for me right now is the fashion on the street. The Manrepeller is one of the most inspiring things of fashion week. She uses her own artistic vision to piece things together that no one would think of. She takes a different spin on it. I find street fashion so inspiring and so creative. For so many years, I was so focused on the runway, but today the runway is on the street. — As told to Sophia Chabbott

Main Image: Pictures of the Day from New York Fashion Week.

All photographs by KSW.